Skip to main content

How to Place AED Pads on an Infant

When caring for an infant, it is important to know how to place AED pads on the infant. An AED is a lifesaving piece of equipment that can help in cases of life-threatening cardiac arrests, but it must be used correctly in order for it to be effective. It is important to remember that an infant is not just a miniature adult, and their pediatric AED pads must be placed differently than adult pads. This article will explain the proper placement of AED pediatric pads on an infant and answer the question can you use adult AED pads on a child?

What is an AED

An Automatic External Defibrillator, or AED, is a portable lifesaving device used to deliver an electric shock to the heart of someone in cardiac arrest. It’s typically used by trained medical professionals and first responders. AEDs come in two variations: semi-automatic and fully automatic. A semi-automatic AED is considered a manual defibrillator because when instructed the responder must press the flashing shock button on the AED.

What is an AED

Most AED devices are designed with two sets of electrodes: one for adult pads and one for pediatric pads. The machine analyzes a patient’s heart rhythm and then delivers an electric shock if it detects a life-threatening arrhythmia such as ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia associated with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

If successful, the AED can help restore normal heart rhythm and improve the chances of survival. In addition, an AED is accessible by anyone to use in a public setting in case of emergency. This life-saving device is essential for those who may be victims of SCA.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a life-threatening medical emergency resulting from an abrupt failure of the heart’s electrical system. During SCA, the victim will go into cardiac arrest and can typically only be revived with quick and proper treatment.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

An AED is used to treat SCA, which delivers a shock to the heart using adult pads or pediatric AED pads with electrodes. To increase a victim’s chance of survival, it is important to quickly administer an electric shock as soon as possible. Immediately upon recognizing SCA, one should begin CPR and start chest compressions even before the AED can be administered.

Time is of the essence in reviving SCA victims, and prompt action with an AED could be the difference between life and sudden cardiac death.

Difference Between Adult Pads and Infant AED Pads

In the case of sudden cardiac arrest in adults and children, using an AED is one of the most effective ways to restore a normal heart rhythm during an SCA event. There are differences between infant AED pads vs adult AED pads and it is important to note that adult AED pads should not be used on children and infants under 8 years of age or anyone less than 55 pounds.

Difference Between Adult Pads and Infant AED Pads

Pediatric electrode pads sometimes referred to as child pads are specifically designed for use with children and infants, as they have different body mass and anatomy than adults. Adult AED pads may deliver too much energy or shock to a child’s delicate system.

Additionally, adult pads may not sense the heart rhythm correctly due to the difference in their chest size compared to adults. Therefore, it is important to always use pediatric electrode pads on children and infants when using an AED.

Understanding Different Pad Placement Requirements

It is important to understand the different placement configurations for electrode pads for the use of an AED on adults and children.

Anterior-Lateral Pad Placement

Anterior/lateral AED pad placement is the optimal method for adult patients, using two electrode pads on the bare skin of the SCA victim, one placed on the anterior left side of the chest and one placed on the lateral right. This anterior chest method is where both sets of electrode pads are applied to the front of the victim. This allows current to travel directly through the heart muscle cells thus providing better shock efficacy. Position a pad above the nipple on the victim’s right chest, slightly below their clavicle (collar bone). Position the other pad lower, below the left nipple, and more to the side of the chest.

Anterior-Lateral Pad Placement

Anterior-Posterior Pad Placement

Anterior-posterior placement of the defibrillator pads is an alternate option for placing adult pads on a victim which can be used when attempting to avoid pacemakers, nipple piercings, and wounds on an adult SCA victim.

Anterior-Posterior Pad Placement

Anterior-Posterior Pad Placement Pediatric

Anterior-posterior pediatric pad placement for children and infants is necessary to provide effective shock therapy as the size of their hearts and placement requirements are different than adults. The pediatric-child pads should be placed in the anterior-posterior position, with one pad on the infant’s upper left chest and one pad going on the child/infant’s back, exactly between the shoulder blades.

Anterior-Posterior Pad Placement Pediatric

Proper Location for Pad Placement on an Infant

The Proper Location for the placement of electrode pads on an Infant is critical when attempting to resuscitate a child or infant suffering SCA. pads should be placed in the anterior-posterior position for children. Typically an infant or small child less than 55 pounds receives one electrode pad to the chest and the second pad to the back in the middle of the shoulder blade. When used correctly, an AED can assist in restoring normal rhythm and help prevent sudden unexpected infant deaths. Chest compressions are also necessary when using an AED on a child or infant, as they will help circulate oxygen-rich blood throughout the body which can help to increase the chances of recovery. It is important to place the pads correctly in order to maximize their effectiveness so that when the AED is used, it can properly detect and deliver a shock to the heart if needed.

Preparing an Infant for AED Pad Placement

When preparing an infant for Automated External Defibrillator (AED) pad placement during a cardiac arrest, it is important to remember that the pads should be placed as instructed by your AED which is typically given both as an image on the electrode pads and by verbal instructions from the AED. Infant CPR must also be performed while an AED is being used in order to maintain a heartbeat. The AED is then used to analyze the infant’s heart rhythm and determine if a shock should be delivered. If a shock is necessary, the AED will deliver an electrical current in order to restore normal heart rhythm.

Careful attention must be paid to ensure that the AED pad is applied correctly and that the infant CPR is being performed properly in order to maximize the chance of successful AED shock delivery. It is important that all healthcare providers or first responders are aware of the proper procedure for preparing an infant for AED pad placement and administering a shock if necessary.

Conclusion

In conclusion, proper AED pad placement on an infant is crucial for resuscitation efforts. Knowing the right way to place them will ensure the best possibility of restoring a baby’s heart rhythm. When using an AED, child pads should be placed at the center of the infant’s chest and they must fully touch the skin; beginning CPR or applying chest compressions before the pads touch is not recommended. Taking these steps can help maximize the chance of successful resuscitation, so it is important to familiarize yourself with proper AED pad placement on an infant

AED USA Reviews