Skip to main content

A Comparison of Infant AED Pads vs Adult AED Pads

When life is on the line, every second counts. In the case of sudden cardiac arrest, having the right tools and knowledge is crucial for a successful outcome. One essential tool in treating cardiac arrest is an automated external defibrillator (AED), but it’s not enough to simply have an AED on hand – understanding the differences between infant AED pads vs adult AED pads, as well as proper pad placement, can mean the difference between life and death. In this blog post, we’ll delve into the distinctions between infant and adult AED pads, review proper AED pad placement, and discuss common misconceptions to ensure that you’re fully prepared to save a life in an emergency.

Understanding Infant and Adult AED Pads

Understanding Infant and Adult AED Pads

We are often asked how to place AED pads on an infant. Though they may look similar, infant and adult AED pads differ in both size and energy output. Infant AED pads, also known as pediatric pads, are specifically designed for use on children and infants and deliver a lower electrical current to accommodate their smaller body size.

Adult AED pads, on the other hand, are intended for use on older children and adults and deliver a higher energy level to effectively treat sudden cardiac arrest.

Infant AED Pads

Infant AED pads are designed with the unique needs of pediatric patients in mind. These pads deliver a reduced energy level of approximately 50 joules or 2-4 joules per kilogram, making them appropriate for use on children weighing less than 55 pounds. Pediatric electrode pads are smaller in size, which allows for successful pad placement on a child’s chest and/or back.

It’s important to note that the shelf life of infant/child AED pads is generally 2-4 years from the date of manufacture, and the typical price range for a set of pediatric electrode pads to be included in an AED kit is $100-$135. Note that some AED models combine a battery with a pediatric set of electrode pads which are more expensive but have synchronized expiration dates.

Adult AED Pads

Adult AED pads are larger in size and are suitable for adults and children aged eight and above. These pads are typically placed on the front of the chest, with one pad above the right nipple and the other pad located on the left side, beneath the chest.

Adult AED pads are compatible with AED models featuring separate pediatric pads and those with universal pads.

Proper AED Pad Placement for Infants and Adults

Proper AED Pad Placement for Infants and Adults

Proper placement of AED pads is critical for delivering an effective shock and increasing the likelihood of successful resuscitation. The placement of infant and adult AED pads differs to accommodate the unique anatomical differences between children and adults.

Infant AED pads are positioned on the anterior and posterior of the chest, while adult AED pads are situated on the anterior and lateral of the chest.

Infant AED Pad Placement

For infants, the correct placement of AED pads involves positioning one pad on the center of the chest and the other on the center of the upper back, ensuring that the two pads do not touch.

In the absence of pediatric AED pads, adult pads can be used as a substitute, but it is crucial to apply them in the front-and-back position to accommodate the smaller size of an infant or child.

Adult AED Pad Placement

For adults, the recommended placement of AED pads is one pad above the right nipple and the other pad located on the left side, beneath the chest. Accurate AED pad placement for adults ensures that the shock is administered to the heart in the most efficient manner, increasing the likelihood of successful resuscitation.

AED Compatibility with Infant and Adult Pads

AED Compatibility with Infant and Adult Pads

There are various AED models on the market that are compatible with both infants and adults. Some models feature separate pediatric pads, while others offer universal pads that can be used on patients of all ages.

It’s important to be familiar with the compatibility of your AED to ensure that you’re prepared to use the device on all possible victims.

AED Models with Separate Pediatric Pads

AED models that include separate pediatric pads, such as the Philips HeartStart OnSite AED and Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 series AEDs, provide the added benefit of being specifically designed for pediatric patients. These separate pediatric pads allow for lower energy output, making them suitable for use on infants and children under eight years of age.

AED Models with Universal Pads

Certain AED models, such as those with universal pads, can be employed on both adults and children. While these universal pads offer convenience and versatility, it’s essential to remember that accurate pad placement and energy output levels still need to be considered when using these pads on infants and children.

It is important to note that the energy output levels for infants and children are much lower than those for adults, and the pads must be placed in the correct position in order to ensure the highest energy output levels.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Infants and Adults

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Infants and Adults

Sudden cardiac arrest is not limited to adults; it can also occur in infants and children. In fact, the annual incidence rate of sudden death due to cardiac arrest in infants aged under one is 96.0 per 100,000, excluding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

In adults, the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest is significantly higher, with an estimated annual incidence rate of around 350,000 cases in the United States. Given the prevalence of sudden cardiac arrest in both infants and adults, it’s crucial for AED owners to be prepared to use the device on all potential victims.

Incidence of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Infants

Sudden cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death in infants are relatively uncommon, with estimates ranging from 1 to 3 cases per 100,000 children. Nevertheless, the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in infants underscores the importance of understanding proper AED pad usage and placement for this age group.

Incidence of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Adults

In adults, the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest varies depending on factors such as age, gender, and lifestyle. The median incidence of sudden cardiac death reported is 1.7 per 100,000 person-years.

This highlights the vital role of accurate AED pad placement in increasing the likelihood of successful resuscitation in adults.

American Heart Association (AHA) Recommendations for AED Pad Usage

American Heart Association (AHA) Recommendations for AED Pad Usage

The American Heart Association (AHA) provides guidelines for AED pad usage in infants and adults to ensure the best possible outcome in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. These recommendations emphasize the importance of using the correct type of AED pad and proper pad placement for each age group.

It is important to follow the AHA guidelines for AED pad usage to ensure the best possible outcome in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. The correct type of AED pad and proper pad placement should be used for each age group. This will help you.

AHA Guidelines for Infant AED Pad Use

According to the AHA guidelines, pediatric electrode pads should be used on infants and children under eight years old, with one pad placed on the infant’s chest and the other pad on its back, referred to as anterior-posterior placement.

For children over eight years old, adult pads can be used.

AHA Guidelines for Adult AED Pad Use

The AHA guidelines advise against utilizing pediatric AED pads for adults, as they may not fit correctly and might deliver too little energy.

Instead, adult AED pads should be placed on the anterior of the chest, with one pad above the right nipple and the other pad located on the left side, beneath the chest.

Common Misconceptions about AED Pads

Common Misconceptions about AED Pads

There are some common misconceptions about AED pads that can lead to improper usage and reduced effectiveness in treating sudden cardiac arrest. By debunking these misconceptions, we can ensure that AED owners are better prepared to use their devices correctly and save lives.

Cutting or Altering AED Pads

One common misconception is that AED pads can be cut or altered to fit a specific patient. Cutting or altering AED pads is not recommended, as it may reduce their effectiveness and lead to incorrect placement of the pads, thus diminishing the shock delivered.

Using Child AED Pads on Adults

Another misconception is that child AED pads can be used on adults. Child AED pads should not be used on adults, as they might not fit correctly and might deliver too little energy.

It’s important to use the correct type of AED pad for the patient’s age and size to ensure the best possible outcome.

Summary

In conclusion, understanding the differences between infant and adult AED pads, as well as proper pad placement, is crucial for increasing the likelihood of successful resuscitation in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. By following the American Heart Association guidelines and debunking common misconceptions, we can ensure that AED owners are better equipped to save lives in an emergency. Remember, when it comes to sudden cardiac arrest, every second counts – and having the right knowledge about AED pads can make all the difference.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do AED pads differ between adults and children?

AED pads are specially designed for adults or children. Adult pads put out 150 Joules, while pediatric pads typically put out 50 Joules, providing a smaller shock.

Child pads should be used for victims under 55 lbs and older than 8 years old, and adult pads should be used on those above that weight. It is important to always follow the instructions of the AED when attaching the pads.

Is it OK to use pediatric AED pads on adults?

It is not recommended to use pediatric AED pads on adults due to their lower energy output and potential for ineffective shocks.

Therefore, it is important to use appropriate adult-sized AED pads on all individuals over 8 years old and greater than 55 pounds.

Can you use child AED pads on an infant?

Yes, you can use an AED on an infant as long as you have pediatric pads that are specifically made for infants and children who weigh less than 55 pounds. While adult pads may be used if the AED does not have pediatric settings, it is always best to use the appropriate pediatric pads for the best chance of survival.

Using the right pads is essential for the safety of the infant and for the best chance of survival. It is important to make sure that the pads are properly placed on the infant’s chest and that the AED is set to the correct settings. Additionally, additional information is provided below.

Can you cut AED pads to fit a child?

No, you should never attempt to cut AED pads. Not only is it dangerous, but the results could be unreliable and lead to improper treatment of the patient.

AED USA Reviews