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Automated External Defibrillator Definition

An automated external defibrillator AED is a portable medical device that delivers a shock to the heart through the chest wall in order to restore normal heart rhythm. AEDs are used to treat victims of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), which is when the heart stops beating unexpectedly. When someone who is suffering from life-threatening arrhythmias goes into sudden cardiac arrest, time is critical. Every minute that passes without successful defibrillation decreases the chances of survival by 10%. The automated external defibrillator is designed to be easy to operate and can be deployed by people with no medical training as well as by trained health professionals. This amazing medical device, an AED, can make the difference between life and death when minutes matter.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

SCA is a condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. If this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. SCA is a medical emergency that can lead to death if not treated immediately.

There are many causes of SCA, but the most common is an abnormal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF). This is when the heart’s lower chambers (ventricles) quiver instead of pumping blood. When this happens, the heart cannot pump enough blood to the brain and other vital organs.

SCA can happen to anyone at any time, but it is more common in people with certain health conditions, such as heart disease. People who have had a heart attack or suffer from congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, or a genetic heart condition are at increased risk for SCA.

If you’re at risk for SCA, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk. These include controlling your blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes; quitting smoking; and exercising regularly. You should also talk to your doctor about taking medications to prevent SCA, such as beta-blockers or ACE inhibitors.

Ventricular Fibrillation (Vfib)

Vfib is a common cause of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). It occurs when the heart’s electrical impulses become chaotic, causing the ventricles to quiver uselessly instead of pumping blood. If not treated immediately, VFib will lead to death within minutes. An automated external defibrillator (AED) can automatically diagnose the potentially life-threatening cardiac conditions of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT), and deliver electrical therapy to the patient through pads placed on the patient’s chest.

Ventricular Tachycardia (VT)

Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is a heart condition that causes the ventricles to beat too fast. VT usually starts in the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles). It can lead to ventricular fibrillation (VF), which is a life-threatening arrhythmia. If not treated immediately, VF can lead to death within minutes. An AED can automatically diagnose VT and deliver electrical therapy to the patient through pads placed on the patient’s chest.

How does an AED work?

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are portable electronic devices that use electricity to shock the heart and restore a normal effective rhythm. There are currently six major AED manufacturers with FDA-approved devices for sale in the US. Philips is one of the oldest external defibrillator manufacturers of AEDs and has two main models that for years have set the standard for AED emergency care. The Philips HeartStart HS1 and Philips HeartStart FRx have saved countless lives. Heartsine, Physio-Control, Zoll, Cardiac Science, and Defibtech are the other manufacturers for the US market. The Heartsine line is very advanced and a popular AED in the US. There are three versions of the Heartsine, the 350P, 360P, and the 450P. Finally, the Zoll Plus AED has been on the market as long as any other AED and is very popular.

Automated External Defibrillator Definition

A person suffering from SCA is usually unresponsive and not breathing normally. When an external defibrillator is used, it sends an electrical current through pad electrodes to the chest to the heart. This current stops the chaotic heart activity and allows the heart to re-establish a normal rhythm.

AEDs are portable, easy-to-use devices that can be operated by people with minimal training.

Many AEDs today are either fully automatic or semi-automatic. A semi-automatic AED instructs the responder to push a shock button when needed and the fully automatic AED will announce a shock is about to happen and will initiate a shock to the electrode pads automatically if needed.

When an AED is used on a person in SCA, it will analyze the person’s heart rhythm. If the rhythm shows that a shock is needed, the AED will deliver the shock. Note that an AED does not always deliver a shock to the victim. If the device determines that the individual is not suffering from SCA or that their heart irregularities are not shockable, then the device will not deliver a shock. Asystole is one such condition when the heart flatlines and has no electrical activity at all. This is a non-shockable rhythm and an AED will not provide a shock.

The goal of using an AED is to reestablish a normal heart rhythm so that the person’s blood can flow properly to the brain and other vital organs.

If you witness someone having SCA, call 911 immediately and ask for help. If there is an AED nearby, bring it to the person and follow the instructions on how to use it. Most AEDs will have clear and easy-to-follow prompts.

Using an AED can be the difference between life and death for someone in SCA. If you are trained in CPR and how to use an AED, you can be a vital part of the chain of survival.

Automated external defibrillators: Do you need an AED?

If a person is suffering from SCA, their heart has stopped or is in defibrillation and must be shocked to restore a normal heart rhythm. CPR will only provide some oxygen to the body by forcing the heart to pump blood, but will not defibrillate the heart. AEDs are designed for use by untrained laypeople and provide visual and verbal instructions to guide users through the process of delivering a shock to the victim.

Automated external defibrillators Do you need an AED

According to the latest articles by the American Heart Association (AHA) and AED training, CPR, when combined with early defibrillation, can increase the chances of survival from SCA by as much as 70%. AEDs are an essential tool for bystanders to use in the event of a cardiac emergency and can be found in a variety of public places such as airports, office buildings, and gyms.

The American Red Cross states that if you believe someone is having a cardiac emergency, call 911 immediately and start CPR. If an AED is available, apply it as soon as possible and find an AED.

The above is general information on automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and whether you may need one. An AED is a device that can deliver an electrical shock to the heart in order to restore a normal heart rhythm. AEDs are designed for use by untrained laypeople and provide visual and verbal instructions to guide users through the process of delivering a shock to the victim.

Why are AEDs important?

AEDs are important because they can save lives. When someone has a sudden cardiac arrest, their heart stops beating and they stop breathing. AEDs are portable devices that deliver an electric shock to the heart, which can sometimes restore its normal rhythm. AEDs are easy to use and can be operated by people with no medical training as well as trained first responders.

Why are AEDs important

AEDs are important because they can be the difference between life and death for someone with sudden cardiac arrest. Every second counts when someone has a cardiac arrest, and AEDs can help to restart the heart and save a life.

How to use an AED?

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a portable device that is used to restore the normal heart rhythm in people who are experiencing a life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia, such as ventricular fibrillation.

In order to use an AED, it is important to follow the instructions provided by the device. Most AEDs will have audio or visual prompts that guide the user through the process.

First, the AED pads must be placed on the patient’s bare chest, in order to deliver the electrical shock. The AED will then analyze the patient’s heart rhythm and determine if a shock is needed. If a shock is needed, the AED will deliver the shock automatically.

After the shock is delivered, it is important to continue CPR if necessary. The AED will usually provide instructions on how to proceed. Once emergency medical services arrive, they will take over care of the patient.

Using an AED can be scary, but it is important to remember that it is a life-saving tool. By following the instructions provided by the device, you can help save a life.

Why is it called an automated external defibrillator?

In order to understand the meaning of the term, we need to break down each word.

Automated means that the device does not require an interpretation from a medical professional to read the device and determine if a shock is needed. The modern AED is so advanced it can determine on its own if the victim is suffering from SCA and a shockable event.

External is in reference to the AED is for external use, outside the body. There are defibrillators that are designed to shock the heart during surgery or medical devices implanted in the body to monitor and automatically shock the heart as needed.

Finally, defibrillation is made up of two smaller words: de and fibrillation. To understand the meaning of defibrillation, we must first understand what fibrillation is. Fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm in which the heart’s muscle contractions are erratic, fast, and widespread. This is different from the coordinated contractions that we normally see in a healthy heart. When the heart is in fibrillation, blood is not pumped effectively to the rest of the body. This can lead to organ damage and, if left untreated, death.

Defibrillation is the process of restoring the heart’s normal rhythm by delivering widespread, fast contractions of the heart’s muscles are called fibrillation. When the heart is in fibrillation, blood is not pumped effectively to the rest of the body. This can lead to organ damage and, if left untreated, death.

Defibrillation is the process of restoring the heart’s normal rhythm by delivering an electrical shock

Where to find an AED?

Public access AEDs are found in a variety of locations, including:

  • schools
  • workplaces
  • recreation and sports facilities
  • hospitals
  • airports
  • hotels
  • shopping centers.

AEDs are usually placed in easily accessible locations so that they can be quickly retrieved in an emergency. Some AEDs are placed in automated external defibrillator cabinets mounted on the wall to further increase their visibility and accessibility. More and more businesses are placing AEDs on site as part of their workplace safety program. Many states have laws that require AEDs in certain public places.

In an emergency, seconds count. Having a readily available AED can mean the difference between life and death. Knowing where to find an AED in your community can help you be prepared in the event of a sudden cardiac arrest.

Summary

AEDs are amazing technological devices that save lives. AEDs are easy to use and can be operated by people with no medical training. Every second counts when someone has a cardiac arrest, and AEDs can help to restart the heart and save a life. Knowing where to find an AED in your community can help you be prepared in the event of a sudden cardiac arrest. Most importantly, if you witness what you think is an SCA, don’t hesitate. Act and you can save a life.

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